2633 Pacific Avenue, Stockton, CA 95204 | Phone: 209-944-5530 | Fax: 209-944-5990

Welcome to our health education library. The information shared below is provided to you as an educational and informational source only and is not intended to replace a medical examination or consultation, or medical advice given to you by a physician or medical professional.

Facts About Dietary FatInformaci³n sobre la grasa en la dieta alimenticia

Facts About Dietary Fat

Eating less fat is one of the best things you can do for your heart. Start by finding out which fats are better to use. Then always try to use as little as you can.

Why Eat Less Fat?

  • Cutting down on the fat you eat can lower your blood cholesterol levels. This may help prevent clogged arteries from buildup of plaque.

  • A low-fat diet can help you lose excess weight. Doing so can lower your blood pressure and reduce your chances of getting diabetes.

  • A low-fat diet reduces your risk for stroke and for some cancers.

Unsaturated Fat Is Most Healthy

  • When you must add fat, use unsaturated fat.

  • Unsaturated fats come from plants. They include olive, canola, peanut, corn, safflower, and sunflower oils.

  • Liquid (squeezable) margarine is also mostly unsaturated fat.

  • In moderate amounts, unsaturated fat can even be good for your heart.

Image of food

Saturated Fat Is Less Healthy

  • Avoid eating saturated fat. It raises your blood cholesterol levels.

  • Most saturated fat comes from animals. Foods such as butter, lard, cheese, cream, whole milk, and fatty cuts of meat are high in saturated fat.

  • Some oils, such as palm and coconut oils, are also saturated fats.

Trans Fat Is Least Healthy

  • Also avoid trans fat whenever possible. Even if it's not listed on the food label, look for it in the ingredients in the form of hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils.

  • This is found in snack foods, shortening, french fries, and stick margarines.

Add Flavor Without Fat

  • Sprinkle herbs on fish, chicken, and meat, and in soups.

  • Try herbs, lemon juice, or flavored vinegar on vegetables.

  • Add chopped onions, garlic, and peppers to flavor beans and rice.

Publication Source: American Dietetic Association

Publication Source: American Heart Association

Publication Source: Harvard School of Public Health

Online Source: American Dietetic Association

Online Source: American Heart Association

Online Source: Harvard School of Public Health

Date Last Reviewed: 2007-01-15T00:00:00-07:00

Date Last Modified: 2006-01-01T00:00:00-07:00

To request an appointment, please call our cardiology office in Stockton, California at 209-944-5530 or use our online Appointment Request Form.

Testimonials

Dear Dr. Manshadi, "I wish to thank you for the work you have done to treat my poor heart. You identified the occlusion and did an excellent job in placing the stent. This occurred around coincidently with the birth of your baby boy but you put me at the top of your priorities and proceeded with treatment. Please accept my sincerest appreciation for your good work."
- M. Edwards, actual patient.

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To request an appointment, please call our cardiology office in Stockton California at 209-944-5530 or use our
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Manshadi Heart Institute, Inc.

2633 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95204
Phone: 209-944-5530
Fax: 209-944-5990
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999 S Fairmont #215
Lodi, CA 95240
Phone: 209-944-5530
Fax: 209-944-5990
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